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Henrich HINKLEMANN
c1842-?

The sailing ship "Glenmanna" disembarked 286 passengers in Melbourne on 14th February 1855 on the completion of her first voyage to Melbourne.

Of thirty passengers who were from Nieder-Weisel, nine had been booked on Ticket Number 57. The first five names in this group were 'Jacob Heuser', 'Henri Hincelmann', 'Conrad Adami', 'Margaret Heuser' and 'Ann Heuser'. Jacob was described as an adult (15 years or older); the other four were shown as children. On Ticket Number 58 there is a 'Margaret Heuser' with a 'Conrad Heuser', both adults, who have not yet been accounted for.

There were no Hincelmanns in Nieder-Weisel, but a child born there on 25th April 1845 was registered as Katharina Hauser, now Hinkelmann. Her mother was Katharina Hauser, the first-born and illegitimate daughter of Johann Jakob Hauser and Elisabetha Haub, who were subsequently married. The father of this child was stated to be Christian, a son of Kaspar Hinkelmann of Stauftenberg-by-Giessen; he accepted parenthood. There is no further record of either Christian or Katharina senior or Katharina junior in the parish records which are available.

Other children of Johann Jakob Hauser include Johann Jakob born 1824, Anna Katharina 1829, Konrad 1834 and Margaretha 1832. The father died in 1849. No record of the marriage of any of the children has been found to date.

It is quite possible that Katharina Hauser junior had a brother Henrich and that it was he who came out on "Glenmanna" - he may have been born about 1842 when Katharina senior was 20 years of age. It is reasonable to postulate that Henrich was with his uncle Jakob, then aged 30. The Konrad Adami with this group married Margaretha Hauser, daughter of Johann Jakob, in Nieder-Weisel in 1861 and they went to North America and settled in San Fransisco. As there is no further record of Jakob Hauser or the other members of this group in Victorian marriage or death indexes, it seems likely that they would have returned to Germany also.
 

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